What Foley does
What Foley does
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Musical Homogeneity:
Content sourced from Michael Beinhorn. http://michaelbeinhorn.com/
The next time your grandmother complains about how modern music all sounds the same, you should be hard pressed to argue with her. The Spanish National Research Council have proven that music, from pop to jazz has lost diversity and has become homogenised. The colour pallet used for this project is muted. What was once a bright pink has been dulled to a pastel reinforcing the homogenised concept.  The images have, in some instances been stepped and repeated to suggest a ‘mould-’like’, factory production towards music. Furthermore some images have been multiplied (in Photoshop) to re-enforce the flattening or homogenised concept. The ‘factory’ like approach that the music industry in taking is reflected in the use of an OCR font which originated to quickly process bar-code information. The format marks back to a day where NME and Hotpress were in tabloid form, clearly distinguishing themselves from the glossary periodicals that sat beside them on the newsagents shelves. Their interest was obvious. Their intent was clear but like the music, their intent has been diluted into a homogenised mainstream. The issue highlighted within this publication aims to elaborate on the reconstructed, re-interpreted and altered nature of music, seen through the tampered imagery and typefaces. The intention of this is to emphasize the fact that people should be more vigilant, more creative and expressive in the wake of this technology and an accompanying mindset which is driven by values other than quality.
Musical Homogeneity:
Content sourced from Michael Beinhorn. http://michaelbeinhorn.com/
The next time your grandmother complains about how modern music all sounds the same, you should be hard pressed to argue with her. The Spanish National Research Council have proven that music, from pop to jazz has lost diversity and has become homogenised. The colour pallet used for this project is muted. What was once a bright pink has been dulled to a pastel reinforcing the homogenised concept.  The images have, in some instances been stepped and repeated to suggest a ‘mould-’like’, factory production towards music. Furthermore some images have been multiplied (in Photoshop) to re-enforce the flattening or homogenised concept. The ‘factory’ like approach that the music industry in taking is reflected in the use of an OCR font which originated to quickly process bar-code information. The format marks back to a day where NME and Hotpress were in tabloid form, clearly distinguishing themselves from the glossary periodicals that sat beside them on the newsagents shelves. Their interest was obvious. Their intent was clear but like the music, their intent has been diluted into a homogenised mainstream. The issue highlighted within this publication aims to elaborate on the reconstructed, re-interpreted and altered nature of music, seen through the tampered imagery and typefaces. The intention of this is to emphasize the fact that people should be more vigilant, more creative and expressive in the wake of this technology and an accompanying mindset which is driven by values other than quality.
Musical Homogeneity:
Content sourced from Michael Beinhorn. http://michaelbeinhorn.com/
The next time your grandmother complains about how modern music all sounds the same, you should be hard pressed to argue with her. The Spanish National Research Council have proven that music, from pop to jazz has lost diversity and has become homogenised. The colour pallet used for this project is muted. What was once a bright pink has been dulled to a pastel reinforcing the homogenised concept.  The images have, in some instances been stepped and repeated to suggest a ‘mould-’like’, factory production towards music. Furthermore some images have been multiplied (in Photoshop) to re-enforce the flattening or homogenised concept. The ‘factory’ like approach that the music industry in taking is reflected in the use of an OCR font which originated to quickly process bar-code information. The format marks back to a day where NME and Hotpress were in tabloid form, clearly distinguishing themselves from the glossary periodicals that sat beside them on the newsagents shelves. Their interest was obvious. Their intent was clear but like the music, their intent has been diluted into a homogenised mainstream. The issue highlighted within this publication aims to elaborate on the reconstructed, re-interpreted and altered nature of music, seen through the tampered imagery and typefaces. The intention of this is to emphasize the fact that people should be more vigilant, more creative and expressive in the wake of this technology and an accompanying mindset which is driven by values other than quality.
Musical Homogeneity:
Content sourced from Michael Beinhorn. http://michaelbeinhorn.com/
The next time your grandmother complains about how modern music all sounds the same, you should be hard pressed to argue with her. The Spanish National Research Council have proven that music, from pop to jazz has lost diversity and has become homogenised. The colour pallet used for this project is muted. What was once a bright pink has been dulled to a pastel reinforcing the homogenised concept.  The images have, in some instances been stepped and repeated to suggest a ‘mould-’like’, factory production towards music. Furthermore some images have been multiplied (in Photoshop) to re-enforce the flattening or homogenised concept. The ‘factory’ like approach that the music industry in taking is reflected in the use of an OCR font which originated to quickly process bar-code information. The format marks back to a day where NME and Hotpress were in tabloid form, clearly distinguishing themselves from the glossary periodicals that sat beside them on the newsagents shelves. Their interest was obvious. Their intent was clear but like the music, their intent has been diluted into a homogenised mainstream. The issue highlighted within this publication aims to elaborate on the reconstructed, re-interpreted and altered nature of music, seen through the tampered imagery and typefaces. The intention of this is to emphasize the fact that people should be more vigilant, more creative and expressive in the wake of this technology and an accompanying mindset which is driven by values other than quality.
Musical Homogeneity:
Content sourced from Michael Beinhorn. http://michaelbeinhorn.com/
The next time your grandmother complains about how modern music all sounds the same, you should be hard pressed to argue with her. The Spanish National Research Council have proven that music, from pop to jazz has lost diversity and has become homogenised. The colour pallet used for this project is muted. What was once a bright pink has been dulled to a pastel reinforcing the homogenised concept.  The images have, in some instances been stepped and repeated to suggest a ‘mould-’like’, factory production towards music. Furthermore some images have been multiplied (in Photoshop) to re-enforce the flattening or homogenised concept. The ‘factory’ like approach that the music industry in taking is reflected in the use of an OCR font which originated to quickly process bar-code information. The format marks back to a day where NME and Hotpress were in tabloid form, clearly distinguishing themselves from the glossary periodicals that sat beside them on the newsagents shelves. Their interest was obvious. Their intent was clear but like the music, their intent has been diluted into a homogenised mainstream. The issue highlighted within this publication aims to elaborate on the reconstructed, re-interpreted and altered nature of music, seen through the tampered imagery and typefaces. The intention of this is to emphasize the fact that people should be more vigilant, more creative and expressive in the wake of this technology and an accompanying mindset which is driven by values other than quality.
Musical Homogeneity:
Content sourced from Michael Beinhorn. http://michaelbeinhorn.com/
The next time your grandmother complains about how modern music all sounds the same, you should be hard pressed to argue with her. The Spanish National Research Council have proven that music, from pop to jazz has lost diversity and has become homogenised. The colour pallet used for this project is muted. What was once a bright pink has been dulled to a pastel reinforcing the homogenised concept.  The images have, in some instances been stepped and repeated to suggest a ‘mould-’like’, factory production towards music. Furthermore some images have been multiplied (in Photoshop) to re-enforce the flattening or homogenised concept. The ‘factory’ like approach that the music industry in taking is reflected in the use of an OCR font which originated to quickly process bar-code information. The format marks back to a day where NME and Hotpress were in tabloid form, clearly distinguishing themselves from the glossary periodicals that sat beside them on the newsagents shelves. Their interest was obvious. Their intent was clear but like the music, their intent has been diluted into a homogenised mainstream. The issue highlighted within this publication aims to elaborate on the reconstructed, re-interpreted and altered nature of music, seen through the tampered imagery and typefaces. The intention of this is to emphasize the fact that people should be more vigilant, more creative and expressive in the wake of this technology and an accompanying mindset which is driven by values other than quality.
Musical Homogeneity:
Content sourced from Michael Beinhorn. http://michaelbeinhorn.com/
The next time your grandmother complains about how modern music all sounds the same, you should be hard pressed to argue with her. The Spanish National Research Council have proven that music, from pop to jazz has lost diversity and has become homogenised. The colour pallet used for this project is muted. What was once a bright pink has been dulled to a pastel reinforcing the homogenised concept.  The images have, in some instances been stepped and repeated to suggest a ‘mould-’like’, factory production towards music. Furthermore some images have been multiplied (in Photoshop) to re-enforce the flattening or homogenised concept. The ‘factory’ like approach that the music industry in taking is reflected in the use of an OCR font which originated to quickly process bar-code information. The format marks back to a day where NME and Hotpress were in tabloid form, clearly distinguishing themselves from the glossary periodicals that sat beside them on the newsagents shelves. Their interest was obvious. Their intent was clear but like the music, their intent has been diluted into a homogenised mainstream. The issue highlighted within this publication aims to elaborate on the reconstructed, re-interpreted and altered nature of music, seen through the tampered imagery and typefaces. The intention of this is to emphasize the fact that people should be more vigilant, more creative and expressive in the wake of this technology and an accompanying mindset which is driven by values other than quality.
Musical Homogeneity:
Content sourced from Michael Beinhorn. http://michaelbeinhorn.com/
The next time your grandmother complains about how modern music all sounds the same, you should be hard pressed to argue with her. The Spanish National Research Council have proven that music, from pop to jazz has lost diversity and has become homogenised. The colour pallet used for this project is muted. What was once a bright pink has been dulled to a pastel reinforcing the homogenised concept.  The images have, in some instances been stepped and repeated to suggest a ‘mould-’like’, factory production towards music. Furthermore some images have been multiplied (in Photoshop) to re-enforce the flattening or homogenised concept. The ‘factory’ like approach that the music industry in taking is reflected in the use of an OCR font which originated to quickly process bar-code information. The format marks back to a day where NME and Hotpress were in tabloid form, clearly distinguishing themselves from the glossary periodicals that sat beside them on the newsagents shelves. Their interest was obvious. Their intent was clear but like the music, their intent has been diluted into a homogenised mainstream. The issue highlighted within this publication aims to elaborate on the reconstructed, re-interpreted and altered nature of music, seen through the tampered imagery and typefaces. The intention of this is to emphasize the fact that people should be more vigilant, more creative and expressive in the wake of this technology and an accompanying mindset which is driven by values other than quality.
Musical Homogeneity:
Content sourced from Michael Beinhorn. http://michaelbeinhorn.com/
The next time your grandmother complains about how modern music all sounds the same, you should be hard pressed to argue with her. The Spanish National Research Council have proven that music, from pop to jazz has lost diversity and has become homogenised. The colour pallet used for this project is muted. What was once a bright pink has been dulled to a pastel reinforcing the homogenised concept.  The images have, in some instances been stepped and repeated to suggest a ‘mould-’like’, factory production towards music. Furthermore some images have been multiplied (in Photoshop) to re-enforce the flattening or homogenised concept. The ‘factory’ like approach that the music industry in taking is reflected in the use of an OCR font which originated to quickly process bar-code information. The format marks back to a day where NME and Hotpress were in tabloid form, clearly distinguishing themselves from the glossary periodicals that sat beside them on the newsagents shelves. Their interest was obvious. Their intent was clear but like the music, their intent has been diluted into a homogenised mainstream. The issue highlighted within this publication aims to elaborate on the reconstructed, re-interpreted and altered nature of music, seen through the tampered imagery and typefaces. The intention of this is to emphasize the fact that people should be more vigilant, more creative and expressive in the wake of this technology and an accompanying mindset which is driven by values other than quality.
Musical Homogeneity:
Content sourced from Michael Beinhorn. http://michaelbeinhorn.com/
The next time your grandmother complains about how modern music all sounds the same, you should be hard pressed to argue with her. The Spanish National Research Council have proven that music, from pop to jazz has lost diversity and has become homogenised. The colour pallet used for this project is muted. What was once a bright pink has been dulled to a pastel reinforcing the homogenised concept.  The images have, in some instances been stepped and repeated to suggest a ‘mould-’like’, factory production towards music. Furthermore some images have been multiplied (in Photoshop) to re-enforce the flattening or homogenised concept. The ‘factory’ like approach that the music industry in taking is reflected in the use of an OCR font which originated to quickly process bar-code information. The format marks back to a day where NME and Hotpress were in tabloid form, clearly distinguishing themselves from the glossary periodicals that sat beside them on the newsagents shelves. Their interest was obvious. Their intent was clear but like the music, their intent has been diluted into a homogenised mainstream. The issue highlighted within this publication aims to elaborate on the reconstructed, re-interpreted and altered nature of music, seen through the tampered imagery and typefaces. The intention of this is to emphasize the fact that people should be more vigilant, more creative and expressive in the wake of this technology and an accompanying mindset which is driven by values other than quality.
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Info-graphic Project:
The weather is very important to us. It’s something we live our lives by. It can be the deciding factor in some of the big (and small) decisions we make. We know that weather can affect our mood: sun makes the nation a happier one, while the rain seems to keep us in a permanently miserable state! However, more recently there has been concern that weather is becoming an event in itself. In fact, some of the biggest news events over the last number of years have been direct consequence of our weather: hurricanes in the US, major flooding here in Ireland, etc. While we have learned to control and manage most things in our lives, weather is something over which we have no control at all. In a future issue of it’s upcoming Saturday ‘Weekend’ supplement, The Guardian newspaper has decided to devote the whole issue to weather. Wight pages of the supplement will be given over to visualising some of the statistics and information generated by worldwide weather patterns. The statistics will be accompanied by a short essay which will be supplied in the coming weeks. Yearly averages of five of the most popular European cities are demonstrated using illustrated graphs in this booklet.  The greyscale colour sceme represents the sky, complimenting the structural elements of cities. There is a theme of turquoise running through the booklet to signify the sky element in the background.
Info-graphic Project:
The weather is very important to us. It’s something we live our lives by. It can be the deciding factor in some of the big (and small) decisions we make. We know that weather can affect our mood: sun makes the nation a happier one, while the rain seems to keep us in a permanently miserable state! However, more recently there has been concern that weather is becoming an event in itself. In fact, some of the biggest news events over the last number of years have been direct consequence of our weather: hurricanes in the US, major flooding here in Ireland, etc. While we have learned to control and manage most things in our lives, weather is something over which we have no control at all. In a future issue of it’s upcoming Saturday ‘Weekend’ supplement, The Guardian newspaper has decided to devote the whole issue to weather. Wight pages of the supplement will be given over to visualising some of the statistics and information generated by worldwide weather patterns. The statistics will be accompanied by a short essay which will be supplied in the coming weeks. Yearly averages of five of the most popular European cities are demonstrated using illustrated graphs in this booklet.  The greyscale colour sceme represents the sky, complimenting the structural elements of cities. There is a theme of turquoise running through the booklet to signify the sky element in the background.
Info-graphic Project:
The weather is very important to us. It’s something we live our lives by. It can be the deciding factor in some of the big (and small) decisions we make. We know that weather can affect our mood: sun makes the nation a happier one, while the rain seems to keep us in a permanently miserable state! However, more recently there has been concern that weather is becoming an event in itself. In fact, some of the biggest news events over the last number of years have been direct consequence of our weather: hurricanes in the US, major flooding here in Ireland, etc. While we have learned to control and manage most things in our lives, weather is something over which we have no control at all. In a future issue of it’s upcoming Saturday ‘Weekend’ supplement, The Guardian newspaper has decided to devote the whole issue to weather. Wight pages of the supplement will be given over to visualising some of the statistics and information generated by worldwide weather patterns. The statistics will be accompanied by a short essay which will be supplied in the coming weeks. Yearly averages of five of the most popular European cities are demonstrated using illustrated graphs in this booklet.  The greyscale colour sceme represents the sky, complimenting the structural elements of cities. There is a theme of turquoise running through the booklet to signify the sky element in the background.
Info-graphic Project:
The weather is very important to us. It’s something we live our lives by. It can be the deciding factor in some of the big (and small) decisions we make. We know that weather can affect our mood: sun makes the nation a happier one, while the rain seems to keep us in a permanently miserable state! However, more recently there has been concern that weather is becoming an event in itself. In fact, some of the biggest news events over the last number of years have been direct consequence of our weather: hurricanes in the US, major flooding here in Ireland, etc. While we have learned to control and manage most things in our lives, weather is something over which we have no control at all. In a future issue of it’s upcoming Saturday ‘Weekend’ supplement, The Guardian newspaper has decided to devote the whole issue to weather. Wight pages of the supplement will be given over to visualising some of the statistics and information generated by worldwide weather patterns. The statistics will be accompanied by a short essay which will be supplied in the coming weeks. Yearly averages of five of the most popular European cities are demonstrated using illustrated graphs in this booklet.  The greyscale colour sceme represents the sky, complimenting the structural elements of cities. There is a theme of turquoise running through the booklet to signify the sky element in the background.
Info-graphic Project:
The weather is very important to us. It’s something we live our lives by. It can be the deciding factor in some of the big (and small) decisions we make. We know that weather can affect our mood: sun makes the nation a happier one, while the rain seems to keep us in a permanently miserable state! However, more recently there has been concern that weather is becoming an event in itself. In fact, some of the biggest news events over the last number of years have been direct consequence of our weather: hurricanes in the US, major flooding here in Ireland, etc. While we have learned to control and manage most things in our lives, weather is something over which we have no control at all. In a future issue of it’s upcoming Saturday ‘Weekend’ supplement, The Guardian newspaper has decided to devote the whole issue to weather. Wight pages of the supplement will be given over to visualising some of the statistics and information generated by worldwide weather patterns. The statistics will be accompanied by a short essay which will be supplied in the coming weeks. Yearly averages of five of the most popular European cities are demonstrated using illustrated graphs in this booklet.  The greyscale colour sceme represents the sky, complimenting the structural elements of cities. There is a theme of turquoise running through the booklet to signify the sky element in the background.
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Side project based around one of my favourite films, Amelie!
- Sinéad Foley
Side project based around one of my favourite films, Amelie!
- Sinéad Foley
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Poster for my friends project ‘The Forgotten Zine Archive’, found at Seomra Spraoi in Belvedere, Dublin.
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Digital Painting numero three! Osha from Game of Thrones.
- Artist: Sinéad Foley
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Scene 1: Sci-Fi Animation.
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Key Card Designs.
Key Card Designs.
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Work Placement. My spot in the work place..
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Greetings.
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Work Placement Report: Cover.
Hand-drawn lettering.
- Sinéad Foley.
Work Placement Report: Cover.
Hand-drawn lettering.
- Sinéad Foley.
Work Placement Report: Cover.
Hand-drawn lettering.
- Sinéad Foley.